New? Click Here

Rates

  • $120-150 for a 50 minute session
  • $180-240 for a 85 minute session

PAYMENT AND CANCELLATION POLICIES:

Payment is required at the beginning of each session, and 24 hour notice is required for all appointment cancellations.  Appointments cancelled in less than 24 hours will be charged the full session fee.

INSURANCE:

Trellis Counseling is currently contracted with the following PPO’s:

  • Regence/Blue Cross/Blue Shield
  • Aetna
  • UnitedHealthcare
  • Providence
  • PacificSource
  • Medicare

DID YOU KNOW?

You may also be able to use a Flex Spending Account (FSA) or Health Savings Account (HSA) to pay for counseling. Check with your insurance provider to see if you can use your account for mental health services provided by a Licensed Professional Counselor or Licensed Clinical Social Worker.

FAQs

What kinds of things do people seek help for?

People seek therapy for a variety of reasons including feeling unhappy, unfulfilled, worried, sad, or angry.  People also seek out therapy to help change behaviors that are troubling them including addictive or disordered behaviors or behaviors that affect their relationships at home or at work.  Some people seek therapy because they have a life goal that has been eluding them and they are ready to explore their barriers.  Other people seek out therapy because they know they are going through a difficult time or facing a difficult decision and they desire a place to sort through their feelings and move forward in their life with intention and clear thinking.

Do I really need therapy?  I can usually handle my problems.

Everyone goes through challenging situations in life, and while you may have successfully navigated through other difficulties you’ve faced, there’s nothing wrong with seeking out extra support when you need it. In fact, therapy is for people who have enough self-awareness to realize they need a helping hand, and that is something to be admired. You are taking responsibility by accepting where you’re at in life and making a commitment to change the situation by seeking therapy. Therapy provides long-lasting benefits and support, giving you the tools you need to avoid triggers, re-direct damaging patterns, and overcome whatever challenges you face.

How can therapy help me?

A number of benefits are available from participating in therapy. Therapists can provide support, problem-solving skills, and enhanced coping strategies for issues such as depression, anxiety, relationship troubles, unresolved childhood issues, grief, stress management, body image issues and creative blocks. Many people also find that therapists can be a tremendous asset to managing personal growth, interpersonal relationships, family concerns, marriage issues, and the hassles of daily life. Therapists can provide a fresh perspective on a difficult problem or point you in the direction of a solution. The benefits you obtain from therapy depend on how well you use the process and put into practice what you learn. Some of the benefits available from therapy include:

  • Attaining a better understanding of yourself, your goals and values
  • Developing skills for improving your relationships
  • Finding resolution to the issues or concerns that led you to seek therapy
  • Learning new ways to cope with stress and anxiety
  • Managing anger, grief, depression, and other emotional pressures
  • Improving communications and listening skills
  • Changing old behavior patterns and developing new ones
  • Discovering new ways to solve problems in your family or marriage
  • Improving your self-esteem and boosting self-confidence

What is therapy like?

Because each person has different issues and goals for therapy, therapy will be different depending on the individual.  In general, you can expect to discuss the current events happening in your life, your personal history relevant to your issue, and report progress (or any new insights gained) from the previous therapy session.  Depending on your specific needs, therapy can be short-term, for a specific issue, or longer-term, to deal with more difficult patterns or your desire for more personal development.  Either way, it is most common to schedule regular sessions with your therapist (usually weekly).

It is important to understand that you will get more results from therapy if you actively participate in the process.  The ultimate purpose of therapy is to help you bring what you learn in session back into your life.  Therefore, beyond the work you do in therapy sessions, your therapist may suggest some things you can do outside of therapy to support your process – such as reading a pertinent book, journaling on specific topics, noting particular behaviors or taking action on your goals. People seeking psychotherapy are ready to make positive changes in their lives, are open to new perspectives and take responsibility for their lives.

How long does a therapy session take?

Sessions are typically scheduled for 50 minutes and most people see their therapist once a week for consistent progress to be made.

How much does therapy cost?

A typical therapy session costs $120-150.  While many clients are initially very concerned about whether or not they can afford therapy, most find that as their life and priorities change new ways of funding therapy appear–whether through less need to consume to distract from pain or through new means of income due to increased energy and investment in life.

What about medication vs. psychotherapy?  

It is well established that the long-term solution to mental and emotional problems and the pain they cause cannot be solved solely by medication. Instead of just treating the symptom, therapy addresses the cause of our distress and the behavior patterns that curb our progress. You can best achieve sustainable growth and a greater sense of well-being with an integrative approach to wellness.  Working with your medical doctor you can determine what’s best for you, and in some cases a combination of medication and therapy is the right course of action.

Does what we talk about in therapy remain confidential?

Confidentiality is one of the most important components between a client and psychotherapist. Successful therapy requires a high degree of trust with highly sensitive subject matter that is usually not discussed anywhere but the therapist’s office.   Every therapist should provide a written copy of their confidential disclosure agreement, and you can expect that what you discuss in session will not be shared with anyone.  This is called “Informed consent”.  Sometimes, however, you may want your therapist to share information or give an update to someone on your healthcare team (your Physician, Naturopath, Attorney), but by law your therapist cannot release this information without obtaining your written permission.

However, state law and professional ethics require therapists to maintain confidentiality except for the following situations:

  • Suspected past or present abuse or neglect of children, adults, and elders to the authorities, including Child Protection and law enforcement, based on information provided by the client or collateral sources.
  • If the therapist has reason to suspect the client is seriously in danger of harming him/herself or has threatened to harm another person.

Do you take insurance?

We are currently credentialed with Regence/Blue Cross/Blue Shield, Aetna, UnitedHealthcare, Providence, PacificSource, and Medicare.

For other insurance panels we are considered “Out of Network”. For these full payment is due at the time of service and we can then provide our clients with “superbills”, a form that assists the client in seeking reimbursement by including what most insurances want: CPT (procedure) codes, diagnoses, etc. Most insurance plans do not cover 100% of all charges. It is the responsibility of the client to pay the full cost of services at the time they are rendered and to engage with their insurance company regarding reimbursement.

What happens during the first appointment?

If you decide to start therapy you can call us at: 503-659-3480 and set up your first appointment called the “intake session.” You will be provided with paperwork to fill out prior to the first appointment and you are asked to fill that out as soon as possible to give the therapist time to review the forms prior to meeting with you. If you are unable to fill the paperwork out prior to the appointment, please let the therapist know by calling 503-659-3480 to make arrangements for an alternative.

It is important to understand that your first session is not really therapy. Like all clinics, therapy starts with the intake session. It is an intake session because your therapist has to “take in” information about you and your situation in order to begin to create your individualized treatment plan.  Sometimes the intake will be continued into your second session; it all depends on how much information is gathered in the first session. Your therapist will let you know if the intake needs to be continued for your second session.

Once the intake is complete, your therapist will come up with an appropriate diagnosis and create an individualized treatment plan to address your situation and work on healing. You and your therapist will go over your treatment plan, and address any questions. After the intake session is done and the treatment plan is completed, therapy begins.

How long will therapy take?

Although none of us can predict the future, the treatment plan that your therapist creates for you will have a completed section regarding the “anticipated date of resolution” which is the estimated end date for therapy. This date may be 3-6 months of therapy for issues that are more minor (for example, “adjustment disorders”) or maybe 6-12 months for issues that usually take longer to treat (for example, abuse, trauma, depression, anxiety, marriage therapy, etc.). Depending on your therapist’s diagnosis and treatment plan, your therapist may recommend appointments be scheduled on a weekly, bi-weekly, monthly or bi-monthly basis. We believe that a good therapist is about empowering clients to work toward healing and thus no longer needing therapy.

What if there is a lapse in sessions?

If you or your therapist decides to wait longer than a month between sessions, your therapist will probably do a quick “clinical update” which consists of a few questions regarding current symptoms and other information. This update usually only takes about five or ten minutes to complete. Depending on the schedule you and your therapist have determined to be the best fit for meeting together, should you do not schedule or fail to attend sessions over a 3 session period it may be necessary to inactivate your file. Should that happen and you would like to re-engage in therapy, please call 503-659-3480 to discuss getting rescheduled.

Do you have a sliding-fee scale?

Unfortunately, we are unable to provide this type of service. If there are financial difficulties interfering with your ability to pay, we are willing to set up a payment plan.  Please contact the office manager for more information before scheduling the intake session. If you need a therapist who offers a sliding-fee scale, we may be able to help refer you to a clinic that does.

What do LCSW and LPC stand for?

LCSW are the initials to indicate a Licensed Clinical Social Worker and LPC indicate a Licensed Professional Counselor.  This means that the clinician has a Master’s Degree in Social Work or Mental Health Counseling and has completed the necessary requirements to be fully licensed in the state of Oregon. Licensing requirements include completing 3,500 post-Master’s level work hours under the supervision of an LCSW or LPC and passing the licensing exam in social work or a national counseling exam.

What is trauma and what do I need to know about it?

What is trauma and what do I need to know about it? It seems like there is so much we hear about “trauma”. Trauma can …

Looking for help is sign of strength

Individual treatment is often termed as psychotherapy, and is meant to help people with their emotional issues, which can …

Get the most out of your work day

There are many emotional issues that find a corner in our heart, and refuse to die down. With time, these issues can transform …